I’ve briefly mentioned The Beresford Hotel before and it’ll come as no surprise to most of you that this example of Streamline Moderne is one of my favourite buildings in the city.

It was originally built a year before the outbreak of World War II (that’s 1938, history fans) to provide accommodation for visitors attending the Empire Exhibition in Bellahouston Park. Unusually its architect was also the owner and managing director of the hotel, something which I’m sure your boy from Grand Designs would be furious about.

During the war it became a favourite haunt of American servicemen but it went into steep decline after the war and was sold off to Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI) in 1952 and was converted to offices.

It was sold again in 1964 to Strathclyde University who reconverted it into accommodation for their students and renamed it Baird Hall, both uses a far cry from the glamour of its original purpose.

The Beresford was converted again in 2003 to private apartments and, speaking as someone who used to live on Sauchiehall Street, they must be lovely and quiet at the weekends.

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This photograph, taken c. 1977 shows the original subway station at St. Enoch with the modern entrance to the station being dug out from underneath. The tops of the escalators are (very approximately) where the beam is in the foreground.
During the modernisation of Glasgow’s subway system in the 70s, there were a number of alterations to stations and many were replaced with modern stations but the old St Enoch station survives today.
If you’re interested in finding out more about how the Subway has changed since it opened, there’s a wee post about its ‘ghost station’ which you can read right here.
I’m afraid I’ve had this photo kicking around so long that I’m not sure who originally took it. If you know, please drop me a message and I’ll add a credit.
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This photograph, taken c. 1977 shows the original subway station at St. Enoch with the modern entrance to the station being dug out from underneath. The tops of the escalators are (very approximately) where the beam is in the foreground.

During the modernisation of Glasgow’s subway system in the 70s, there were a number of alterations to stations and many were replaced with modern stations but the old St Enoch station survives today.

If you’re interested in finding out more about how the Subway has changed since it opened, there’s a wee post about its ‘ghost station’ which you can read right here.

I’m afraid I’ve had this photo kicking around so long that I’m not sure who originally took it. If you know, please drop me a message and I’ll add a credit.

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The Old Glasgow map is a virtual tour of all the sites mentioned on this blog and means you don’t have to be resident in the city to go for a dander about. All you’ve got to do is click here.
Nae danger.
Also, don’t forget to come and say hi on Facebook & Twitter.

The Old Glasgow map is a virtual tour of all the sites mentioned on this blog and means you don’t have to be resident in the city to go for a dander about. All you’ve got to do is click here.

Nae danger.

Also, don’t forget to come and say hi on Facebook & Twitter.


Someone asked me to look out some old photos of Battlefield on the Facebook the other week there and I squirrelled these away in drafts to show you guys. As I’ve been away for a couple of weeks and need to get myself back into the swing of posting regularly, here’s a quickie.

Given the name, you would be forgiven that this area of the South Side resembles the Somme, but it actually comes from the Battle of Langside in 1568 which Mary Queen of Scots supposedly watched from Cathcart Castle.

The ‘rest’ pictured in the first two images sits in the shadow of the Victoria Infirmary and is as much a landmark in the city as its overbearing neighbour. It was originally built in 1915 as a tram shelter (you can see a tram in the 1904 shot on the bottom right) and newsagent and its grandiose design meant that it quickly became a symbol of the area.

It is due in no small part to the work of the owners of the restaurant which now occupies it that the building survives today. Although it was B-listed by the council in 1981, they decided to tear it down in 1990 after structural faults were found.

After a petition against the demolition order was accepted by the council (I know- remember when they worked?), extensive restoration works were carried out and the Battlefield Rest(aurant) was opened in 1994.

It’s still going strong today and thanks to them we’re still able to enjoy this oddity of public transport architecture. So thanks for that.

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Anonymous asked: Trying to put a face to the words. Any resemblance - Túlio Monteiro (Brazilian Ornithologist from the film 'Rio')?

Not a million miles away, I suppose.


glasgowmuseums:

Please Give Us Your Views!
The West Court Gallery at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is having a makeover, and we would like to offer you the opportunity to tell us what objects captivate you and why. Is it Sir Roger the Elephant? The Spitfire? Or is it all about Fulton’s Orrery?
Either take a photo of your favourite object (selfies welcome!) or draw a picture of it, and remember to tell us why it matters to you.
How to give us your views:
To submit your thoughts, photos or sketches, simply click on ‘Your Views’ at the top or foot of this page. You may also like to ‘Ask a Question’, again, using the same options.
We look forward to hearing from you!
Best wishes
Glasgow Museums

I know that you lot are mad about selfies and now glasgowmuseums are actually asking you to take one in front of fantastic collections in Kelvingrove. 

Onward!

glasgowmuseums:

Please Give Us Your Views!

The West Court Gallery at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is having a makeover, and we would like to offer you the opportunity to tell us what objects captivate you and why. Is it Sir Roger the Elephant? The Spitfire? Or is it all about Fulton’s Orrery?

Either take a photo of your favourite object (selfies welcome!) or draw a picture of it, and remember to tell us why it matters to you.

How to give us your views:

To submit your thoughts, photos or sketches, simply click on ‘Your Views’ at the top or foot of this page. You may also like to ‘Ask a Question’, again, using the same options.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Best wishes

Glasgow Museums

I know that you lot are mad about selfies and now glasgowmuseums are actually asking you to take one in front of fantastic collections in Kelvingrove. Onward!

Anonymous proves that cream always rises to the top:

Could you find so information on the Creme de la Creme Restaurant? It used to be an old cinema converted into a restaurant in the West End. I used to go there as a kid and loved it! Was devastated when it was demolished.

Now a Tesco (isn’t everything?) and “luxury” apartments, I’m led to believe that the restaurant housed in this old cinema was something of a Glasgow institution.

The original building wasn’t exactly an architectural gem, being described by a Hidden Glasgow user as looking ‘like a watchtower on Alcatraz Island’ although I suppose there’s no accounting for taste. After the cinema closed in 1959, it went on to become a boxing arena, bingo club, nightclub before finally taking on its final guise as Creme De La Creme.

You can get a rough idea of what the restaurant looked like inside from the poster I’ve posted in the images but given its modest claim to be Europe’s largest and finest, I’m sure there are people still experiencing flashbacks to their innovative flavour combinations.

Unusually for Old Glasgow, Creme De La Creme only closed in 2005 and therefore I’d encourage anyone who went to give me a shout and let me know what the food was like (I’ll stick the best ones at the end of this). 

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Here’s a (slightly paraphrased) question from @Tall_Tucks on the Old Glasgow Twitter:

Do you still take requests? My Mum would like to know about the Sick Children’s Hospital dispensary on West Graham Street.

First of all, to anyone wondering, I do take requests but I don’t have any Diana Ross so don’t even ask.

This deceptively large curiosity sits among the new builds of Cowcaddens and doesn’t make a lot of sense if viewed out of context. Why would a dispensary for a Sick Children’s hospital be so far from Yorkhill?

Well, as I briefly mentioned in a previous post, l’hôpital de sick weans hasn’t always been out in the West End. Up until 1914, the hospital was in Garnethill, just a (championship winning) stone’s throw from the Dispensary. The building at 45 Scott Street is still there today and forms part of St. Aloysius College.

Since the original hospital was significantly smaller than the leviathan at Yorkhill, the directors and medical staff intended to try and treat as many children as they could in an outpatient capacity. They had originally planned to build a Dispensary for that purpose on the hospital site but had run out of money. 

Luckily the Duchess of Montrose (for it is she) organised a ‘Fancy Fair’ in the St. Andrew’s Hall to raise money. To sum up the idea of a ‘Fancy Fair’ in a sentence, it’s like a Bring & Buy Sale for people with more money than sense. Regardless, the money was raised and the Dispensary built.

It opened in 1888 and provided a large dispensing room, a waiting area, consulting rooms for physicians, an isolation room for infectious weans and accommodation for the sisters and caretaker.

In 1889 the Dispensary saw more than 4,000 patients and this number had more than tripled by 1914. 

When the new hospital opened, the Dispensary continued its work with poor children, adding a physiotherapy department, a department for skin diseases and a speech clinic to its already large repertoire. It was eventually closed when the new outpatient unit opened at Yorkhill in 1953 and served as various labs for the Western Region Hospital Board until it was bought by Glasgow School of Art.

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Anonymous asked: sight of tower ballroom cowcaddens 1930

Hi there, you’ll find more details on the Tower Ballroom here:

image

The Tower Ballroom


I thought that for Old Glasgow’s first birthday that I’d regale you with a tale from the Ol’ Wild West (of Scotland).

The American West has long grabbed the attention of those living in drab old blighty and captivated them with tales of infinite dust-bowls, gunslingers, Native tribes, cowboys, lassos, damsels, and clichés. 

While the concept of the Western may have died, not even to be resurrected by Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained’ (although there’s still time Quentin, never stop trying), there is still something appealing to the modern sensibility about the idea of boundless frontiers and the exploration of the unknown.

This delight in the unknown was just as prominent at the height of the British Empire. Britannia ruled the waves and- for that matter- most of the land but she didn’t rule America. It had only been a matter of a century since the British had been unceremoniously turfed out of the New World and she was losing many of her people to this promised land which had begun anew in the wake of a devastating civil war.

It was into this environment that “Buffalo” Bill Cody and his troupe rolled into Glasgow in November 1891, having been booked for a residency in Dennistoun’s East End Exhibition Buildings.

The famous American scout and bison hunter’s (who won the exclusive right to the Buffalo name in an eight-hour buffalo shooting match) troupe included the legendary Annie Oakley (on whom Annie Get Your Gun is based) whose most famous trick was to repeatedly split a playing card, edge-on, and put several more holes in it before it could touch the ground, all from a distance of 90 feet (27m).

The show, titled The Drama of Civilization, presented a biased view of how the American frontiersmen had imposed ‘civilisation’ on the ‘Red Indian’.

A lot of you might remember the famous ‘Ghost Dance Shirt' which was displayed in Kelvingrove until 1999. It was said to have been worn by a Lakota Sioux warrior killed at the Wounded Knee Massacre. This massacre, in which 300 Lakota Sioux (mostly women and children) died took place in December 1890, less than a year before Cody and his show came to Glasgow.

Quite how that was worked into the show and given as an example of ‘civilising’ the Lakota Sioux, we’ll never know but I assume there wasn’t a sequence where US Cavalrymen chased down and murdered unarmed Natives.

The shirt held a grizzly fascination for me as a kid with the simple cotton torn in several places by bullets and the suggestion of dried blood around the holes. You can see the letter of sale addressed the curator of ‘Calvin Grove Museum’ from George Crager, the show manager and famed Lakota translator.

The show itself was an incredible success, regardless of the proximity of many of its cast to events going on at home. Glasgow was captivated by their appearances and many of the cast began to feel quite at home in Glasgow, perhaps with the exception of Charging Thunder, who ended up spending a month in Barlinnie for assaulting the afore mentioned Mr Crager.

They returned in 1904, touring the length and bredth of Scotland. If you’re interested in finding out more about Buffalo Bill and his travelling shows, check out this crowdfunded documentary and put your money where your mouth is, Pardner.

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